Please share far and wide!

Sunday, September 6, 2015

Nuclear "Trust Us, the Next Generation Nuclear Will Be Safe", and "No One Has Died Yet"

"We have had nuclear power for seventy years and no one died."
This is from Jebus at ENENEWS, doing some great work lately.

Cancer is just the tip of the Iceberg

We went through the fifties and nothing bad happened.

Mayak
Sellafield
Santa Susana

We went through the sixties and nothing bad happened.

Idaho fallls
Fermi

We went through the seventies and nothing bad happened.

Oblast
TMI

We went through the eighties and nothing bad happened.

Chernobyl

We went through the nineties and nothing bad happened.

Tokaimura

We made it through to 2010 and nothing bad happened.

Fukushima
Pilgrim (one step away from a massive radiation release in 2015)


Just to name a few massive releases of toxic nuclear waste.

And most of it went into the sea. The Ocean.       Fukushima still is…

400+ nuclear power plants.
We've already taken the risk.

Someday, there is going to be a lot of environmental contamination from nuclear waste…

Cancer


"Someday", something bad is going to happen with/from nuclear power…

Cesium 137. The flag. 30 year half life.
The most prolific actinide.
Repeat before you rinse. Again…

Delirious
Disorientated
Nightmare
Enter Strontium…
Why are we saying so many goodbye's…

--------------------------------------------------

stock here:
And the nuclear cartel tells us "trust us" the next generation will be safe.   They don't even pretend anymore that it will be "cheap"

1 comment:

  1. "Cesium 137. The flag. 30 year half life. The most prolific actinide" Actually, it's the worst [i]fission product[/i]. Actinides are atoms of U233, U235 and PU239 which did not split by a neutron, but instead, absorbed the neutron, making them unstable too. The process of absorbing neutrons can also be applied to what's called fertile, such as TH 232 and U238, to make the fissile U233 and PU239 What makes U235 is nature. People extract the small amount of it that's in regular uranium (U238) to enrich it for their purpose. A few percent (LEU) for powerplants and about 90% (HEU) for weapons.
    Today, I learned just how dangerous the fission product caesium 137 is (before, my only concern was if it was easier to extract HEU from a would be molten salt reactor than from the ground up).
    You gotta know a lot about basic nuclear (more than I do) to really convince the people like me (who used to really think that advanced nuclear was the best way to stop excess CO2, as it would be more power dense and therefore "easier" than renewables).

    ReplyDelete

Insightful and Relevant if Irreverent Comments