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Monday, July 6, 2015

Flood Risks at USA Nuclear Plants Is At Dangerously Levels, the NRC Admits It, But Takes Little Action

And its not just risk from flooding, there is also risk from Dam failure.
So far, dam failures have not affected any U.S. nuclear power plants. But in July 2011 we learned that we may been luckier than we knew, as the NRC released a report stating that previous estimates of flood risk for many reactors were based on outdated information and would need to be revised upward.
http://www.ucsusa.org/nuclear_power/making-nuclear-power-safer/preventing-nuclear-accidents/flood-risk-at-nuclear-power-plants.html#.VZrcA_mgs8I




stock here: I put together this list of plants that are at risk from floods and dams
In Tennessee there maybe needs to be a reactor or 2 added

 http://www.newswise.com/articles/major-midwest-flood-risk-underestimated-by-as-much-as-five-feet-study-finds
Using the Criss equation, which gives more weight to modern river conditions, the present-day (2015) projected high water mark for a 100-year flood event on the St. Louis riverfront would be 51.5 feet, or more than 21 feet above flood stage.
For comparison, the official “100-year” flood levels at St. Louis would be only 46.1 feet according to USACE (2004), or 46.2 feet according to FEMA (2011).
“The official calculations for the ‘100-year’ flood level at St. Louis are about 5.5 feet too low, primarily because they neglect both the tendency for the flood levels to increase over time and the increased volatility we’re seeing with extreme weather swings,” Criss said.
While a miscalculation of a few feet may not seem like a problem, it can make a huge difference when it comes to the reliability of our existing flood control systems.


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